Two Saints wander off into a Different World – 18

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Thankfully, the bird people were on their side. The bird people rarely cared if they were busy, and visited them whenever they liked. But they had become friends eventually. And so they carried Maki and Chiharu to the train station when they were ready. And then Maki quickly put on her boy disguise.

 

“Two children’s tickets to Noir.”

“Oh? Just children?”

“We are going to meet a relative.”

“I see. Well, hold tight onto your bags. You can find instructions on choosing an inn once you arrive at Noir station, so you should check there.”

“Thank you.”

“You take good care of your little sister.”

“Yes.”

 

The old man who sold them the tickets looked warmly at the two children holding hands. But they were really 25. And so when he was later asked:

 

“Did you see two noble boys here?”

 

He said:

 

“Who knows. They sure didn’t buy any tickets from me.”

 

That was all he could tell them. Maki and Chiharu had gone to the small store in the station with sparkling eyes. They carefully chose bottles of water and fruit juice and some sandwiches, before getting into their car. There was something a little too cheerful about them for children who were just orphaned, but it didn’t bother anyone too much. The place had an all-around festive mood due to the unveiling of the Saintesses.

 

It was during the afternoon when Maki and Chiharu got in the train and found their seats, which were four empty seats facing each other. The trains were full of excited people who had seen the Saintesses.

 

“Hey, the seats near those kids are empty.”

“Oh, how lucky. It would be squishy if it were four adults, but it should be fine with young children.”

 

Two men came towards them now. They must be adventurers, as they were tough and brawny looking. One was human and the other was a dwarf.

 

“Ho, mind if we sit here?”

“Go ahead.”

 

Perhaps these kids had never seen adventurers before because while they consented, they just stared at the two men with open mouths.

 

“Is it so unusual to see a tall dwarf then?”

 

The two kids nodded.

 

“I am on the big side for a dwarf.”

 

Well, he was really the size of an average human. He was also quite wide and looked like it would be cramped if they sat side by side. And so the kids said:

 

“Uh, could we take the window seats then?”

 

And so all four were able to sit comfortably.

 

“Is this your first time on a train?”

 

The kids nodded.

 

“While this runs underground, the walls are all illuminated. So you can clearly see outside. And it ain’t just walls all of the time. You can see underground lakes as well. Don’t you miss it.”

“Underground lakes!”

“What? Haven’t you heard of them? This tunnel connects underground areas that already existed. And so we will occasionally pass through open caverns and lakes. Dwarven skills are impressive, eh?”

 

The kids immediately pressed their noses against the window.

 

“Haha. It’s a little too early to be looking.”

 

A bell started to ring.

 

“And now, we’re off.”

 

The dwarf said, and the train started to move.

Next Chapter

 

11 Comments Leave a comment

  1. Just to point out, a female saint is a saint, not a saintress, it’s like a female pilot is not a pilotress or a female baker is not a bakeress. It’s one of those omni-gender terms.

      • It’s not even “not usually used” but a totally new word other than rare “misuses” in the past when English was olde. I can accept Phoenix’s claim of an evolving language but if you ever used it in an exam, expect to see a red circle.

    • Language evolve over time. If saintess is used by enough people, the word would probably be added to the language sooner or later. Pilotress and bakeress sounds weird, but saintess sounds more natural, and the online community seems to latch into it, so it’s more likely to be adopted officially into English.

  2. This idea that a 25 year old woman could pass as a child just because she’s somewhat short compared to the population on average seems incredibly bizarre to me.

    • Eh. I am 32 and still often get mistaken for a teenager and occasionally even 12. It feels weird to me, but it’s something I can’t change. And while I’m shorter than average, I’m not as short as a child either.

    • It’s a family problem for me. When I was 32, I had a co-worker who thought I was joking and reversed my age and when my sister who was about 20+ walked into an Australian restaurant once while we were on vacation, they gave her a balloon.

  3. Binged this series up till here and wanted to say thanks for translating this easy going series~
    Interested to see the other lands finally but also rip the MCs drinking adventures.
    Some folks in Japan are honestly really small and surprised me so I wouldn’t doubt their looks being a double edged sword on them lol. Let’s just hope they don’t have strict drinking age rules there xD

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